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NJBMS - Volume 1, Issue 1, July - September 2010

Pages: 35-39

MAKING CASE SCENARIOS MORE INTERESTING AND RELEVANT: MY EXPERIENCES

Author: SHANKAR PR

Category: Pharmacology

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Abstract:

South Asia is a region undergoing rapid change. The Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Nepal admits students from Nepal, India and Sri Lanka to the undergraduate medical (MBBS) course. KIST Medical College, a new medical school in Lalitpur admits Nepalese students for MBBS. I am a clinical pharmacologist and also facilitate a Medical Humanities module. The department of Pharmacology concentrates on teaching students to use essential medicines rationally. The case scenarios and problems which I came across were either not relevant to a South Asian context or mainly concentrated on the technical aspects of treatment. I decided to construct problems and case scenarios which also concentrate on the individual and social aspects in addition to the treatment. The case scenarios are mainly derived from a South Asian or Nepalese perspective. I believe in using full names so that the students can identify with the person described. The names are either fictitious or have been changed to protect privacy. In this write up I will describe selected case scenarios which were used for the learning of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and the Medical Humanities. The scenarios deal with drug abuse, leprosy, depression and contraception. The Medical Humanities scenarios are about accessibility to health care, fairness creams and reluctance of doctors to serve in rural areas. I have briefly described how I used these scenarios to explore issues beyond the usual confines of medicine in two Nepalese medical schools. South Asia is a region undergoing rapid change. Countries like India and Pakistan are enjoying rapid economic growth after liberalization. Nepal is just recovering from a decade long conflict and the political situation is still unstable. Sri Lanka threatens to get embroiled again in a violent, ethnic conflict.

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Editor in Chief of NJBMS Dr.Deepti Shastri, Professor and Head, Department of Anatomy, Academic Co-ordinator for Pre and Paraclinical Sciences, VMKV Medical College & Hospital, Salem.


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