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NJBMS - Volume 1, Issue 1, July - September 2010

Pages: 11-14
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PRANAYAMA AND HEART

Author: VARUN MALHOTRA, JAI GANGA, SAUMYA, NAVIN R, SRINIVAS RAGAVAN, KSHITIZ DHUNGL

Category: Physiology

Abstract:

This study is designed to see change in pulse rate after three pranayamas. We selected suryanadisuddhi pranayama, chandranadisuddhi pranayama and anuloma viloma pranayama to perform this study. Suryanadisuddhi pranayama starts with closing the left nostril with the thumb of the left hand followed by exhalation through right nostril and inhaling slowly through the same nostril. This forms one round of suryanadisuddi pranayama. Pulse rate was recorded before and after twelve cycles of right nostril breathing. Thirty two readings were taken. The pulse rate dropped from 71.19±6.3 to 65.88±5.6. The change is significant at p<0.001. Chandranadisuddhi pranayama starts with closing the right nostril with the thumb of the right hand followed by exhalation through left nostril and inhaling slowly through the same nostril. This forms one round of chandranadisuddi pranayama. Pulse rate was recorded before and after twelve cycles of left nostril breathing. Sixty readings were taken. The pulse rate dropped from 73.7±5.3 to 66.7± 3.2. The changes is significant at p<0.001.The anuloma viloma pranayama starts with closing the right nostril with the thumb of the right hand, inhaling through the left nostril, holding the breath, followed by exhalation though right nostril, closing the left nostril with index finger of right hand and then reversing the process. This forms one round of Nadisuddhi pranayama. Pulse rate was recorded after five minutes of rest and after twelve cycles of Nadisuddhi pranayama. Sixty six readings of different subjects were taken. The pulse rate dropped from 81.5±5.3 to 72.9±8.7. The change is significant at p<0.001(using paired test). The subjects felt joy, peace and were calm. These three pranayamas charge the body with an increased supply of oxygen through the lungs. The oxygen "burns" or oxidizes the waste impurities, chiefly carbon, in the venous blood. This process of purification is enhanced by an accompanying large increase in expulsion of waste carbon dioxide from the lungs during exhalation. As a consequence, very little of the tissue remains in the blood as waste material. There is less need for the breath, as the flow to the lungs of blood for purification slows down. The heart and lungs are given extraordinary rest.

Keywords: Heart, Yoga