Join us   Log in   editor.njbms16@gmail.com  


NJBMS - Volume 5, Issue 4, April - June 2015

Pages: 125-130
Print Article   Download XML  Download PDF

INCREASED CARDIORESPIRATORY EFFICIENCY AT REST AS AN EFFECT OF DAILY PRACTICE OF RELAXATION TECHNIQUES FOR 8 WEEKS IN 1st PHASE MBBS STUDENTS.

Author: ANAND DHARWADKAR, ASHA A. DHARWADKAR

Category: Physiology

Abstract:

Background : Many studies observed effect of yoga and other relaxation techniques, practiced to reduce stress of life, as parasympatho dominance on cardiorespiratory parameters.

Aim : To assess effect of 8 weeks of daily practice of three selected relaxation techniques, on resting cardiorespiratory parameters in 1st phase medical students of both sexes.

Materials and Methods : Resting cardiorespiratory parameters like Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), respiratory rate (RR), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), breath holding time (BHT) were recorded before and after a period of 8 weeks of daily practice of relaxation techniques like, prayer, deep breathing, and whole body muscle relaxation. Data obtained was analysed (SPSS 16th version) by Student&rsquo;s t-test; P<0.05significant.

Results: In the present study, after daily practice of relaxation techniques for 8 weeks, there is no significant change in resting HR, pulse pressure, RR and BHT, with a significant proportionate increase in systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and PEFR. Unchanged resting HR with significant increased MAP of 5mm Hg, indicate normal autonomic balance with better perfusion pressure. Maintenance of resting RR and BHT with significant increased PEFR, suggests unchanged respiratory center sensitivity with decreased peripheral resistance to airflow.

Conclusion: Ten minutes daily practice of above relaxation techniques for 8 weeks increases cardiorespiratory efficiency at rest which in turn may enhance body&rsquo;s preparedness to stress.

Keywords: Arterial pressure; Autonomic nervous system; Breath holding; Heart rate; Muscle relaxation; Peak expiratory flow rate; Relaxation therapy; Respiratory rate; Medical students, Yoga.